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Next Meet

"Wild Camping"

1st - 3rd March 2013

Next Social

AGM. Portland D136.
map

Thursday 14th March
8.00 pm

If you don't want this for a time, please comment it-Fabian !Next Ice Climb

Manchester Indoor Ice Wall
Friday 1st December at 8:30am

If you don't want this for a time, please comment it-Fabian !Next Climb

This year our courses were slightly under-full. Whilst this is a bit more expensive for the club, it certainly isn't a bad thing from a learning point of view for paticipants.

We used the same guides this year as we have done in previous years: Talisman guides.

Rons Blog has picture of the Mountaineering course.

Fi Blog has pictures of the Walking course.

Talisman also has a facebook group you should all like.

Jonathan is teaching Robbie how to climb in winter.

To do the climbing course, you should first build up a reportoire of rock climbing ability and knowledge. This is a good way to learn and understnad principles of gear placement and rope management in a less serious context. So if anyone is aspireing to winter climb, I would advise them to 1) brush up on their rock skills 2) brush up on general mountain skills such as survival and navigation. In Scottish winter, it is common to top-out in a whiteout and haveto use map and compass to aid a safe decent. 3) Practice walking and accending snow slopes in crampons, and using an ice axe for set arrest. Winter walking skills (such as these) are all useful for the winte climber, since approch and decent from a mountain crag requires them.

On day 2 of our trip the whether was still and crystal clear. The walking group saw a sundog whilst on the summit of caingorm:

Sundogs are made commonly of plate-shaped hexagonal ice crystals in high and cold cirrus clouds or, during very cold weather, by ice crystals called diamond dust drifting in the air at low levels. These crystals act as prisms, bending the light rays passing through them with a minimum deflection of 22. If the crystals are randomly oriented, a complete ring around the sun is seen a halo. But often, as the crystals sink through the air they become vertically aligned, so sunlight is refracted horizontally in this case, sundogs are seen.

Read more about sundogs here.

On the final day, we split into 2 groups: 3 parties climbed Fiacaill ridge and a group went walked accross the plateau to bag Ben Macdui - it was a bit more typically scottish today, with frozen hair and hot aches!

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Page last modified on February 04, 2012, at 07:03 PM