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Next Meet

"Wild Camping"

1st - 3rd March 2013

Next Social

AGM. Portland D136.
map

Thursday 14th March
8.00 pm

If you don't want this for a time, please comment it-Fabian !Next Ice Climb

Manchester Indoor Ice Wall
Friday 1st December at 8:30am

If you don't want this for a time, please comment it-Fabian !Next Climb

The Victorian gentleman Sir Hugh T. Munro was commissioned by the Scottish Mountaineering Club (SMC) to barometrically survey Scotland's mountains to establish how many were above 3000 feet (maps of the time provided no height information) and, in 1891, produced his "Tables" cataloging 236 peaks which he considered to be separate mountains. For this reason Scottish peaks above 3000 feet are called Munros. Sir Hugh Munro began a first revision of his tables, which was completed in 1921 after his death, and subsequent revisions by the SMC were published in 1933, 1981, 1997, and 2009. At each revision peaks have been demoted from or elevated to the status of Munro.
Modern surveying methods reveal 511 peaks above 914 meters. These are divided into "Munros", of which there are currently 283 and Munro Tops.Munro List
Munro Tally

So what are Munro Baggers, and what are they doing it for?

Munro himself never completed his list, after several failed attempts on the Inaccessible Pinnacle on Skye. Given that it was then covered with loose rock and no decent climbing equipment was in existence (thus the name) this is pretty understandable, and many a hillwalker since has abandoned any Munro completion ambitions on first sight of it.

It wasn't until 1923 that a full round including the In Pinn was completed, and up until the seventies an average of only one completion per year was registered with the SMC's keeper of the list. However, some factor (maybe the invention of Goretex) triggered explosive Munro bagging and there are now several thousand Munroists.

A very good book on the history of Munro bagging is The Munro Phenomenon. by Andrew Dempster


For more info, see:

An interactive map of All the Munros from the Munro Magic website

Scottish Mountaineering Council website pages on Munros

Visit Scotland website pages of Munros

Munros on Walk highlands Walkhighlands has route descriptions, photos, 1:25k maps and GPS tracks for many Munros

http://www.btinternet.com/~nigelspencer/web-pages/uk-mountains/scotland-pages/munro/scotland-munro-list-all.htm


This page has the potential to become a really useful Munro reference (there are a few out there on the web, but each seems to lack something), if anyone wants to put in the work....

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Page last modified on March 18, 2010, at 03:12 PM